• Socio-Economic Development

    Balancing conservation and the needs of all our communities

    A tour in the Crocodile River Reserve

What is Biodiversity?

The variety of life on Earth in all its forms is commonly referred to as biodiversity.

The number of species of plants, animals, and microorganisms, the different ecosystems on the planet, such as grasslands, deserts, rainforests and coral reefs are all part of a biologically diverse planet.

Almost all cultures have their roots in our biological diversity in some shape or form as these ecosystems provide humans with oxygen, clean air and water, pollination of plants, pest control and wastewater treatment.

It is for these reasons that declining biodiversity is a massive concern for all on the planet.

The Crocodile River Reserve covers a large area in the Tshwane Metro. It is positioned between Johannesburg, Tshwane and Mogale City. It is surrounded by high density urbanisation, small industry and formal and informal settlements.

The programmes envisioned by the Reserve takes into consideration that being on the urban edge there are a myriad of opportunities in identifying and working with established community leaders and organised groups in large areas where the population is diverse and highly fragmented.

Socio-Economic Programmes Coming Soon

Land Care

Alien Invasive Plant Clearing and Removal

Infrastructure Maintenance

Local Entrepreneurship Development

  • Grass
  • Wood
  • Crafts
  • Environmental Nursery
  • Eco-Tourism
  • Environmental Training

Your suggestions and ideas  for these programmes are welcome. Click here to share them with us.

Browse through our articles below

Ball Python has a snuggle

A Talk By the Jhb Wildlife Vet at the Reserve

The Tree Walk held in the Crocodile River Reserve offered an insightful and easy to understand introduction to the day, starting with the structure of leaves and how to use this to identify a tree. What followed was a walk through the beautiful veld of the Reserve during which we identified a variety of trees - such as the fascinating underground tree Lannae Aedulis, the Diospyros Lycioides (Blue Bush), the common but beautiful Acacia Karroo (Sweet Thorn) and the Protea Caffra Trees but to name a few.
April 20, 2021/by admin
Tree Walk in the Crocodile River Reserve

A Successful Tree Walk in March 2021

The Tree Walk held in the Crocodile River Reserve offered an insightful and easy to understand introduction to the day, starting with the structure of leaves and how to use this to identify a tree. What followed was a walk through the beautiful veld of the Reserve during which we identified a variety of trees - such as the fascinating underground tree Lannae Aedulis, the Diospyros Lycioides (Blue Bush), the common but beautiful Acacia Karroo (Sweet Thorn) and the Protea Caffra Trees but to name a few.
March 24, 2021/by admin
Large Sourplum

Large Sourplum

The ripe fruits of the Ximenia Caffra or Sourplum are eaten by birds such as barbets, bulbuls and starlings and mammals such as giraffe, impala, kudu, grey duiker, steenbok, bushbuck and eland enjoy eating it's leaves. The larvae of a number of butterflies feed on the leaves, some examples being the Bush Scarlet butterfly, Natal and Silvery bar, Bowker's and Saffron sapphire and the Brown playboy.
February 24, 2021/by admin
Lannea Edulis

Lannea Edulis

Lannea edulis has shiny green leaves that are hairy when young and leathery when matured, with creamy white flowers from August to October. It bears bright red ovoid berries from October to December that become purplish black when they become ripe, which have a juicy and pleasantly sour flavour and are eaten by mice, birds and humans.
February 23, 2021/by admin
Buffalo Thorn Tree

Buffalo Thorn Tree

The Buffalo Thorn Tree is widely used for magical and medicinal purposes because of the spines or thorns, which are paired; One is hooked, and the other is straight. According to Nguni legend, the thorns of the Ziziphus tell us something about ourselves - that we must look ahead to the future (straight thorns) but we must never forget where we have come from (hooked thorns).
February 23, 2021/by admin

Our first post-lockdown scorpion walk

After months in lock-down, it was a joy to get back outdoors and into nature, as our creepy crawly expert, Jonathan Leeming, shared fascinating facts about why all arachnids should be treated with respect rather than fear.
October 12, 2020/by admin

Land for Sale?

Criminal syndicates are duping people into buying portions of land that belongs to private landowners. Carte Blanche focusses on Elandsfontein in the South of Johannesburg and an area bordering the Schurveberg Protected Areas of the Crocodile River Reserve north of Johannesburg.
July 20, 2020/by admin
A Cape Skink in the Crocodile River Reserve by Anthony Stewien

Cape Skink

The Cape skink is live-bearing and the female may take up to a week to birth her litter of offspring - often between 8 and 18 per brood. Each baby is born in a thin, membranous bag or 'shell' that it breaks out of within seconds. Newborns measure measure 5 to 7 cm.
April 7, 2020/by admin
Blesbuck

Blesbuck

The blesbok or blesbuck has a distinctive white face and forehead which inspired the name, because bles is the Afrikaans word for a blaze such as one might see on the forehead of a horse.
March 15, 2020/by admin
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